Home | E-mail | Plant files |  Dictionary  | Search 

 
 
 
(1) Division (for plant & fungi)   [ Taxonomy ]
Or Phylum   (for animals)

Dictionary of botanic terminology - index of names

     
  In scientific classification, a division (phylum) is a taxonomic group of related or similar organisms. A division contains one or more classes. A group of similar division forms a Kingdom.  
     
(2) Division (cell division)  [ Biology ]
     
 

Cell division is the process of a biological cell (called a mother cell) dividing into two daughter cells. This leads to growth in multicellular organisms (the growth of tissue) and to procreation (vegetative reproduction) in unicellular organisms.

 
     

(3) Division (vegetative reproduction)  [ Horticulture ]

     
  The division is a procedure of propagating plants by separating each one into two or more sections and then repotting or replanting.  
     
Division is a necessary chore for the maintenance and multiplication of  many perennial plants. This technique is also applied for clustering mat forming  succulents. A few plants never like to be disturbed, and should not be moved or divided; Most others will need division every three to four years or so. It's time to divide when a dead centre forms in the crown area, with a ring of plants around it; blooms are fewer and smaller; or growth appears crowded. A general rule is to divide the plant in the non-bloom season. Midsummer bloomers should be divided in spring. Autumn divisions are done for spring bloomers species. Dig the clump and cut off divisions. If you don't want to divide an entire clump, divisions can be cut from the edge of a clump using a sharp knife. Some plants have tough, thick root systems that are a challenge to divide. After the division of a cactus and succulent it is indispensable to let dry the wounded edges of the new plants for a week or two before planting and watering them.

Compare with: Separation

     

 

 
 
1



 

Old Cactuspedia home | E-mail | Photo gallery | Dictionary | Search 

Please note: this is an obsolete page Try the new Cactuspedia interface